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Shopping in Watamu

Shopping in Watamu

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Small shops made of sheet metal, bearing names that are sometimes knock-offs of famous name brands, manage to get a smile, crammed full with knickknacks made of soap stone and wood, frames and baubles that have more ethnic than commercial value. No credit cards are required, just good bargaining skills, So shopping in Watamu may require hard work.

Artisan on the road

Artisan on the road

Artisan on the road

Artisan on the road

Among the most typical articles of clothing is the pareu and some accessories made with kikoy and kanga in flashy colours.

The kanga is a colourful garment worn by women and occasionally by men. It is a piece of printed cotton fabric, about 1.5m by 1m, often with a border along all four sides (called pindo in Swahili), and a central part (mji) which differs in design from the borders.

The kikoy is a very beautiful cloth used as a shawl/sarong/pareu. Originally, it was typically worn by males.
Made of 100% pure combed cotton, kikoys are garments traditionally worn in tropical countries because they are so comfortable to wear. In fact, kikoys are wrapped around the waist or hips and then rolled down a few times to hold it in place.

Walking down the road that we, jokingly, like to recommend to our clients as the Watamu Champs-Elysèes, you will also will also run into craftsmen who make very beautiful leather flip-flops decorated with colourful beads.

Shopping in Watamu – Related Info

Which currency can I use for my purchases?

The Kenyan shilling is the commonly used currency, and we advise changing Euros or Dollars before making your purchases.

Can I use a “bankcard”?

There are 4 ATMs at Watamu, but only two can be used by tourists to make withdrawals using a credit card. You can also make a withdrawal at the Watamu Casino.

Can I use a credit card?

Very few shops accept credit cards, and be aware of commission fees.

Will I pay commission fees when using my credit card?

Commissions applied by banks when using a credit card here in Kenya are quite high, about 4­-5%.

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